Like the family in the Oscar-winning film, many in Seoul’s so-called dirt-spoon class dwell in basements far below the rich. “Those living up there must look down on people like me like pigs.”

Like the family in the Oscar-winning film, many in Seoul’s so-called dirt-spoon class dwell in basements far below the rich. “Those living up there must look down on people like me like pigs.”

Even before Parasite won the Oscar, local movie fans and foreign tourists had begun visiting the locations where some of the film was shot, to sample the sights and smells of the real-life Seoul that inspired the story.
They visit Ahyeon-dong, a hillside shantytown covered with identical two- or three-story tenements. The cheapest rooms are available in semi-basements there for $250 to $420 a month.
During a recent visit, Piggy Super, a grocery store that appeared in the movie under a different name, offered no fresh meat but was selling plenty of dried fish, liquor and other cheap fare. A man stepped in from the evening cold and bought some instant noodles and an egg for dinner.
He is O.K., said the stores owner, Kim Kyong-soon, 72, looking at the mans back. Unlike others, he doesnt cheat when he counts out his coins.
A warren of narrow alleyways stretch uphill around the grocery store, many ending in steep stairs.
This is the neighborhood of Mr. Kim, the taxi driver. Just outside his door on a recent night, under a streetlight, a neighbor sorted piles of empty paper boxes and other trash she collects for a living.
When Mr. Kim climbs out of his den, he sees a view of tall, sleek, brightly lit apartment blocks looming in the distance like a mirage.

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