Carefree young people around the world are being blamed for fuelling coronavirus cases as many get sick and tired of life in lockdown.

Carefree young people around the world are being blamed for fuelling coronavirus cases as many get sick and tired of life in lockdown.

Young people around the world have been blamed for flouting social distancing rules and fuelling a surge in COVID-19 infections.
Authorities across Europe, the US and North America are facing the issue of how to ensure social distancing measure are still enforced among young people when coronavirus restrictions are being loosened.
This week, WHO emergencies chief Michael Ryan pleaded with young people to act responsibly after the number of infections among young people jumped in a number of countries.
Ask yourself the question: do I really need to go to that party? he said.
In NSW, Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the state was on a ‘knife edge’ this week and asked young people to check their behaviour.
“We’re not saying don’t socialise or don’t go out at all but we are saying please limit your behaviour just in the next few weeks,” she said on Thursday.
“If you have the virus and you go out five times a week to different places you could potentially be spreading it to five different locations, and then we have to contract trace everybody.”
A woman puts a mask on a mannequin in Spain, which has seen local lockdowns lately as virus cases increase. Picture CESAR MANSO / AFP
UK police have also been forced to shut down illegal parties and warn people to maintain their distance on the hottest day of the year on Friday.
Lothar Wieler, of Germany’s Robert Koch Institute, said while young people tend to suffer a less severe form the virus they can infect their families.
Canada, France, Switzerland and Spain have also seen a surge in cases linked to young people.
Youths are the most difficult group to control. They have a lifestyle, a desire to live, which is very different from other groups, the Spanish health ministrys emergencies coordinator, Fernando Simon, said last week.
Punitive measures may be needed to get youths to follow social distancing rules but they should not be demonised, he added.
– With wires

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