As the coronavirus pandemic roils markets and upends business, The Wall Street Journal is gathering in one place all the latest news and insights on the impact on investors, companies and economies.

As the coronavirus pandemic roils markets and upends business, The Wall Street Journal is gathering in one place all the latest news and insights on the impact on investors, companies and economies.

Companies that supply meat, vegetables and other staples are struggling to redirect the nations sprawling food supply chain to meet a surge in demand caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
Restaurant closures and shoppers rush to stock their pantries are forcing the agriculture industry to boost production, hire new employees and set up war rooms to keep grocery stores stocked.
It is in fact unprecedented, the type of growth weve seen, said Noel White, chief executive of Tyson Foods Inc., describing the demand from supermarkets needing to refill shelves.
Still, he said, the food supply is sufficient.
Consumers clamor to stock up is boosting poultry prices. Per-pound prices for boneless chicken breasts are up 30% since the start of March, according to commodity market-research firm Urner Barry.
The Agriculture Department on Monday pledged to make sure federal food inspectors would continue to supervise meat processing and other functions.
Just weeks ago, the U.S. meat industry was contending with oversupply concerns. Chinas reopening to U.S. chicken shipments encouraged companies to raise more and fatter birds, but the coronaviruss spread in China earlier this year bogged down some exports, swelling levels of poultry and pork in U.S. cold-storage facilities.
The viruss spread, and responses of government and businesses, have changed the picture in a matter of days, said Russell Whitman, senior vice president at Urner Barry.

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